Are You In Communion With Your Boss?

Author and business consultant, Patrick Lencioni named his consulting firm, The Table Group, because of his belief that “the single most important and effective tool in business” is the table. Sitting down and meeting with members of our organizations is critical. The health of an organization hinges on whether or not conversations are taking place on a consistent basis and in a manner that productively addresses important issues while keeping the focus on what is best for the organization as a whole.

We’ve all been there where we’ve dreaded a meeting because we knew that nothing important would be on the agenda, that no one would speak up about what was really going on in the organization and how to potentially start addressing the issues, and that no action items or next steps would be assigned, thus leaving us floundering until the next meeting.

But, maybe, hopefully, you’ve been in a meeting where important issues were brought to the table, and the participants of the meeting really wrestled with the topics and worked to find the answers that would best serve the organization as a whole, and that everyone left the meeting knowing what part they played and what was expected of them, and feeling empowered to contribute in a meaningful way.

As I’ve thought about this and how to create a culture that operates in this manner, I got to thinking about the importance of our relationships with our bosses and how that symbiosis, or lack thereof, contributes successfully or poorly to the overall health of our organizations. The bottom line is that sitting down and meeting regularly with our bosses is critical.

I am reminded of Jesus’ relationship with His “boss”, God the Father. We have numerous accounts, given to us in scripture, of Jesus, while He was on earth as a man, meeting regularly with the Father. Scripture tells us that he pleaded with the Father on our behalf, that he shared his frustrations and concerns with the Father, that He declared his plans and purposes to the Father, that He sought direction from the Father, that He asked the Father to reconsider a decision, and that he praised and thanked the Father.

While it goes without saying that we should also be in communion and regular conversation with the Father God in this manner, what about using Christ’s example in our relationships with our bosses?

Can you think of instances where you pleaded with your boss on someone else’s behalf, or you shared your concerns and frustrations with your boss, or you made your goals and aspirations known to your boss, or you asked your boss for guidance on a particular issue, or you asked your boss to reconsider a decision he/she had made, or you thanked your boss?

What would others say about your relationship with your boss? What examples are you providing about the importance of meeting together regularly and working together for the good of the organization, and having shared vision even though your approaches and methodologies may be different?

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